We Can Learn A Lot From Each Other

Powering Through Fear When Talking About Money: An Interview With Donna Hook

By Touran |

 

 

By Louise Harris

People are often afraid to talk about money.  Money talk can be an uncomfortable topic; many people avoid these conversations. To be successful, company owners and project managers must put aside their emotions so they can discuss financial aspects of contracts, says Donna Hook, an expert on communicating about money.

Hook garnered her skills in information technology departments of Fortune 500 firms. She deals with managed resources and also runs her company, Confident Communicator Coach. Clients hire Hook for presentation help or to address a topic at work that is difficult to discuss and resolve. She also coaches clients on how they can deal with finances. Her clients are in the corporate world, private health care practitioners or small company owners.

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Don't Make This One Mistake for your Next Presentation: An Interview with Arjun Buxi

 

 

By Louise Harris

No matter if giving a five-minute presentation to their department heads or a 30-minute speech in front of an audience of 200, people often make the No. 1 biggest mistake. They believe they don't need to prepare for the talk, says Arjun Buxi, an expert in leadership training and public speaking communication techniques.

Buxi teaches Communication at San Jose State University and has taken that knowledge to corporate America where he works as an Executive Coach. He provides leadership training, communication skills and entrepreneurial advice. He owns a company called Culture of Speak.

“When people are asked to speak, they often say 'I will wing it because I know this stuff.' This is the wrong approach,” Buxi said during our interview. “This mistake leads to them rambling on the podium, using a lot of filler words, and getting no impact from their talk. The audience doesn't listen or care.”

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Why Vulnerability is the Key to Building Relationships on Twitter

By Touran |

 

 

By Brandon Fong

I used to think I was cool. That was, until I realized that nobody else thought I was cool. When I first started building my personal brand on Twitter, I did everything wrong. I thought that the best way to do things would be to show people how professional and accomplished I was -- people like that, right?

WRONG.

Nobody relates to people who try to act perfect all the time. This is true in real life, so why wouldn’t it be true on Twitter?

Along my Twitter journey thus far, I’ve made many mistakes, followed bad advice, and probably took much longer to get where I am today than if I had done it correctly.

My new (and dramatically more effective) approach to building a successful Twitter account is all about providing value to people. If you can provide value, make people feel good, and build a relationship with them, you can then start to build a following and loyal trust with your audience.

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8 Ways to Build Self-Confidence When Speaking to Groups: An Interview With Liz Boeder

 

 

By Louise Harris

Women sometimes feel unsure of themselves and are afraid to speak to groups of people. Luckily,  they can discover how to master techniques that will give them all the confidence and power they need to succeed, according to Liz Boeder, an expert in teaching sales skills.

Throughout her business career, Boeder worked in retail sales, training sales associates in the art of selling. She has also honed her skills as a member of Toastmasters, which helps people overcome their fear of public speaking and teaches them to speak more effectively to potential clients and to groups of people. She invites women and men to join her on Savvy to impart her knowledge on public speaking.

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An Introduction to Melodic Embellishment

By Touran |

 

 

By Lars Rosager

When a musician chooses to perform a notated piece, the notation most often undergoes some sort of customization. I have alluded to how memorizing a piece of music may open the door to impromptu stylings in my previous blog article, “Bringing the Music Off the Page: Tips for Memorization.” Continuing from the discussion on memorization, I will introduce the beginning-to-intermediate music student to melodic embellishment. After reading this brief introduction, you will know enough to begin applying the basic concepts in your singing practice.

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The New Vocal Technique I had No Idea About: An Interview with Claudia SanSoucie

 

 

By Theresa DeMario

The Complete Vocal Technique or CVT is a way to teach singing that started in Denmark with the publication of the book by the same title written by a renowned vocal researcher, Catherine Sadolin. There are CVT teachers all over the world, and its popularity is skyrocketing in Europe. Claudia SanSoucie is one of over 300 teachers authorized in this teaching methodology and she was the first teacher here in the U.S. (now there are two). SanSoucie is very passionate about helping people find their voice. She does not strive to shape you into the singer she thinks you should be, but instead helps you discover the singer you want to be.

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3 Tips to Become More Persuasive: An Interview with Juliet Erickson

 

 

By Theresa DeMario 

Juliet Erickson has coached people in the art of persuasion all over the world. She has worked with nonprofit organizations, CEO’s of large corporations, celebrities, and government entities. She even taught Communication and Negotiation at Stanford University. Erickson said she enjoys working with Savvy because she can work with people who may not otherwise be able to afford or even find her services, wherever they may be.

Persuasion is one of those topics that is often misunderstood.  It is not the same thing as manipulation. Erickson describes persuasion as “being relevant enough to help people to change the way they think or act.”

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Picking the Performing Arts College Perfect for You: An Interview with Drew Boudreau

By Touran |

 

By Theresa DeMario

Drew Boudreau of College Auditions Professionals, is firmly grounded in the performing arts. Specifically, Boudreau works in Musical theater and Improv Comedy.  His experience ranges from actor to stage manager to his current position at the Orange County School of the Arts.  On Savvy, Boudreau coaches youth in their college admissions auditions.

During our interview, Boudreau said that a Savvy lesson looks a lot like any other lesson except perhaps more tailor-made and less scripted. Boudreau likes to do an initial interview with the student and the family to make sure everyone is on the same page and to figure out exactly what the student needs to focus on.  After the initial meeting, lessons are done one-on-one with the student.   

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This Simple Lifestyle Change will Improve Your Ability to Learn

By Touran |

 

By Sharleen Dua

A good night’s rest is essential for guaranteed success- and we know that. Despite knowing that it is essential to sleep 6-8 hours a night, especially for retaining new information, we don’t do it. In fact, a third of U.S. adults are not getting enough sleep, which can be detrimental for your health. Not only is sleep necessary to function, but it can also help improve your memory and ability to learn. Studies on the effect of sleep find that a good night's rest after learning something new can improve performance and long term memory.

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3 Lesser-Known Marketable Skills You Can Develop With 1:1 Learning

 

By Ben Thomas

It’s no secret that traditional employment isn’t as stable as it used to be. When it comes to securing your income and improving your quality of life in today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, marketable skills are far more important than degrees. In fact, even if you don’t have a college degree – or if your degree program didn’t teach you a lot of marketable skills – you can still track down additional income and expand your employment horizons by teaching yourself new tricks.

While plenty of articles – including many you’ve probably seen – will tell you to learn computer programming, you might not be particularly interested in developing websites and software. There’s nothing wrong with that. The good news is, the internet is a great place to learn many in-demand skills – including some that you might not have considered learning before.

Here are three lesser-known marketable skills you can teach yourself with online 1:1 learning. 

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